Animal Manure Management

Agricultural Production Animal Manure Management

Animal Manure Management

Recycling local manure nutrients before purchasing fertilizer is key to protecting the environment. Manure can be an economic “Win”, due to its fertility value, and a soil quality “Win”, due to its organic matter.  But it can also be a community risk, due to odors and pathogens. Our live educational programs, online courses, and resources provide science-based information on economically viable, environmentally sound manure handling systems that also comply with all regulations.

Nutrient Management

Water quality is affected by nutrient management when chemicals, soil, and residue move off of agricultural land or below it. This section focuses on a number of production issues that when managed correctly minimize the potential for off-site consequences because excess of the nutrients is limited or eliminated.

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Crop Planning - Soil Testing

Regularly checking soil nutrient status by sampling and analysis should be part of one’s crop production plans regardless of whether manure use is an option. However, soil testing is especially important with manure application to insure that excessive amounts of nutrients are not accumulating in the soil.

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Crop Planning - Manure Nutrient Analysis and Application

Default values for manure nutrient concentrations are typical values, but concentrations can vary substantially from these due to the feeding program, type of animal housing, and manure handling system. Additional variation occurs within animal feeding operations due to time of year and weather conditions.

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Manure Regulations

Livestock Waste Regulations in Nebraska are enforced by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality NDEQ). NDEQ administers both state and federal (EPA) environmental regulations. The governing regulations are called Title 130, Livestock Waste Control Regulations.

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Basic Biosecurity

Every livestock producer wants to keep his or her animals healthy. Healthy animals grow better, produce higher quality products, and require fewer interventions like antibiotics. Along with keeping livestock and poultry well fed and watered, comfortable, and safe, it is important to keep them healthy by minimizing their exposure to disease-causing organisms.

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