Know how. Know now.

UNL Extension provides publications, NebGuides, on many pertinent drinking water issues to give you know how.
Most NebGuides are available in the Web page (HTML) format. If you prefer to print these articles and read offline select the PDF version. All PDFs are 2-4 pages unless otherwise noted. You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to open and print PDF files.

UNL Extension also provides educational programs on Drinking Water topics

Basics

An Introduction to Drinking Water
Reference on drinking water protection, quality and treatment including both public and private drinking water.
PDF version (423 KB)

Water: The Nutrient
How water helps the body function and its nutritive value.
PDF version (585 KB)

Drinking Water: Bottled or Tap? 
Provides discussion of the regulation and safety of drinking water from various sources, both public and private.
PDF version (594 KB)

Minerals and Contaminants in drinking water
information on sources, health effects, testing and management options

Arsenic
   PDF version (608 KB)
Bacteria
   PDF version (672 KB)
Copper
   PDF version (608 KB)
Fluoride
   PDF version (734 KB)
Hard Water / Calcium and Magnesium
   PDF version (400 KB)
Iron and Manganese
   PDF version (652 KB)
Lead
   PDF version (623 KB)
Nitrate - Nitrogen
   PDF version (645 KB)
Sulfates and Hydrogen Sulfide
   PDF version (857 KB)
Uranium
   PDF version (627 KB)

Testing and Treatment

Drinking Water: Testing for Quality
Discusses water testing methods for public and private water systems.
PDF version (319 KB)

Drinking Water: Certified Water Testing Laboratories in Nebraska
Lists approved government and commercial operated laboratories.
PDF version  (128 KB)

Chloromines Water Disinfection
This NebGuide discusses the disinfection process used by the Omaha and Lincoln public water systems.
PDF version (623 KB)

Drinking Water Treatment: An Overview - PDF only (614 KB; 11 pages)
NebGuide provides an overview of household water problems, causes and potential health effects. The treatment methods listed in this guide are for household water problems requiring prolonged treatment.

Drinking Water Treatment: What you need to know when selecting water treatment equipment
PDF version (633 KB)
This NebGuide will help the consumer sort through water quality and treatment issues for the household.

No system is capable of removing all possible contaminants, but several methods are available for home water treatment including:

Sediment Filtration
   PDF version (672 KB)
Activated Carbon Filtration
   PDF version (688 KB)
Water Softening (Ion Exchange)
   PDF version (684 KB)
• Reverse Osmosis
   PDF version (687 KB)
Distillation
   PDF version (624 KB)
Continuous Chlorination
   PDF version (85 KB)
Shock Chlorination
   PDF version (674 KB)

Drinking Water Treatment: Emergency Procedures
Discusses situations requiring an emergency or short-term drinking water supply and methods that can be used to treat limited amounts of water for human consumption.
PDF version (630 KB)

 

 

Conservation

Make Every Drop Count In Your Home -PDF only  (502 KB)
Water use and conservation tactics for property owners.

Make Every Drop Count on Your Lawn -PDF only (120 KB)
Information on efficient water usage on the lawn.

Make Every Drop Count in Your Landscape -PDF only (120 KB)
Information on efficient water usage in the landscape.

Water Wise: Water Conservation in the Home 
PDF version
NebGuide discusses efficient indoor water use including selecting water-efficient appliances, keeping fixtures in good working order, and changing water use practices.

Water Wise: Managing Low-Capacity Private Drinking Water Wells During Drought
PDF version
Groundwater from aquifers supplies almost all household water use in Nebraska's rural areas. When groundwater levels decline during a drought, efficient well management is important.

Other

Drinking Water: Storing an Emergency Supply
Taking a little time now to store an emergency water supply can prepare you for all types of disasters. Learn how you can provide for your entire family and possibly others if your water supply is disrupted.
PDF version (218 KB)

Decommissioning Water Wells To Protect Water Quality and Human Health
Describes the process and available resources when an illegal private well must be abandoned.
PDF version (717 KB)

 

Educational Well Grout Model

These models and videos demonstrate the latest research findings regarding well annulus management during well construction and decommissioning to protect groundwater resources.

Private Drinking Water Systems 

This series of six University of Nebraska – Lincoln Extension NebGuides will help rural families understand and manage their private drinking water systems.

Private Drinking Water Wells: Planning for Water Use
PDF version

Private Drinking Water Wells: Water Sources
PDF version

Private Drinking Water Wells: The Water Well
PDF version

Private Drinking Water Wells: The Distribution System
PDF version

Private Drinking Water Wells: Operation and Maintenance for Mechanical Components
PDF version

Private Drinking Water Wells: Operation and Maintenance for a Safe Well
PDF version


Private Wellhead Protection

This series of six NebGuides are designed to help rural families protect their drinking water. Publications help individuals voluntarily assess contamination risks and develop appropriate responses.

Protecting Private Drinking Water Supplies: An Introduction
PDF version

Protecting Private Drinking Water Supplies: Water Well Location, Construction, Condition, and Management
PDF version

Protecting Private Drinking Water Supplies: Household Wastewater (Sewage) Treatment System Management
PDF version

Protecting Private Drinking Water Supplies: Hazardous Materials and Waste Management
PDF version

Protecting Private Drinking Water Supplies: Pesticide and Fertilizer Storage and Handling
PDF version

Protecting Private Drinking Water Supplies: Runoff Management
PDF version

 



 

 

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