Stormwater Management

Surface Water Stormwater Management

Stormwater Management

Stormwater is water from rain and melting snow and ice. Stormwater can soak into the soil (infiltrate), be held on the surface and evaporate, or run off and end up in a nearby stream, river, or other water body. Before land is developed with buildings, roadways, and agriculture, the majority of stormwater soaks into the soil or evaporates.

LID Atlas

The Low Impact Development (LID) Atlas was created for the National Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials (NEMO) Network by the Connecticut NEMO Program and the California Center for Water and Land Use (http://lidmap.uconn.edu/). The LID Atlas is an interactive tool that provides examples of LID implementation throughout the country.

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Bioretention Gardens

View examples of bioretention gardens in Nebraska.

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Low Impact Development

The key premise of low impact development (LID) is to allow natural systems to manage stormwater when and wherever possible.  LID takes advantage of existing natural features and also designs and constructs systems to imitate natural processes, for example, green roofs, bioretention gardens, and permeable pavement. 

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Rain Gardens

You can reduce water runoff from your yard by planting a rain garden. A rain garden is a small depression planted to flowers and ornamental grasses. It is designed to temporarily hold and soak in rain water from a roof, driveway or open area. A rain garden is not a pond or wetland. It is dry most of the time and holds water after a rain. Water collected in the rain garden slowly soaks into the soil and disappears in less than 48 hours.

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