Wastewater

Surface Water Wastewater

Wastewater

Extension at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is actively involved in programming that helps homeowners, industry, and youth audiences understand onsite wastewater treatment systems for handling domestic sewage. Treatment of wastewater using onsite systems, such as septic tanks and drainfields, plays a very important role in protecting the water and environment of Nebraska and supporting economic development. As a result of Extension programming, Nebraskans benefit from improved water quality and a cleaner environment.

What happens in the lagoon?

Evaporation reduces the liquid volume of wastewater, returning water vapor to the environment. Solids settle to bottom and form sludge. There is an aerobic zone at the top of the wastewater layer where air movement introduces oxygen and aerobic microorganisms convert waste to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and phosphates.

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How Does a Lagoon Work?

A traditional lagoon system is a two part system. A traditional system has plumbing from the house and a lagoon.

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Troubleshooting Septic Systems

Problems sometimes occur. Some of the problems that occur include: sluggish drainage, contaminated drinking water, wastewater surfacing in the yard, odors, and pipes freezing.

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Septic systems operation and maintenance overview

Pump tank regularly. Have a professional inspect and pump the tank. Conserve water and spread usage over a period of time. Manage solids. Keep hazardous materials out. Let the system work naturally. Avoid drainfield compaction. Avoid introducing excess water to the drainfield. Maintain structural integrity of the drainfield.

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What Happens in the Trench?

The effluent is distributed through the pipes/gravel or chambers, then percolates down into the soil. Oxygen is present and aerobic bacteria break down the waste. Viruses are held by soil particles and die over time.

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