Animal Manure Management

Agricultural Production Animal Manure Management

Animal Manure Management

Recycling local manure nutrients before purchasing fertilizer is key to protecting the environment. Manure can be an economic “Win”, due to its fertility value, and a soil quality “Win”, due to its organic matter.  But it can also be a community risk, due to odors and pathogens. Our live educational programs, online courses, and resources provide science-based information on economically viable, environmentally sound manure handling systems that also comply with all regulations.

Air Quality

The University of Nebraska is addressing air quality issues associated with animal agriculture in several ways because good air quality is very important to Nebraskans.

Read More

Odor Footprint Tool

The Odor Footprint Tool (OFT) estimates the frequency of annoying odor events around an existing or proposed livestock facility and uses this information to determine minimum separation distances that should be maintained around those facilities and to help in siting decisions.

Read More

OFT Worksheet Version

Step-by-step instructions for using the worksheet version of the Odor Footprint Tool and an example completed worksheet are provided in the following documents.

Read More

Manure Management for Biosecurity

The potential for disease transfer due to manure handling equipment moving among manure storages or farms should not be overlooked. If a producer operates their own pumping equipment, they will know if PEDV or other diseases are a risk on their farm and should be able to take extra precautions to avoid spreading the disease to other facilities or farms that they own.

Read More

Mortality Management

In Nebraska, routine livestock mortalities can be legally disposed of in five different ways: burial, incineration, composting, rendering, and disposal in a landfill. Regardless of which method is used, it is important to dispose of the animal or animals within 24 hours of death, or sooner if possible. When choosing a mortality disposal method, cost, labor input, and personal preferences usually dictate an individual’s decision.

Read More

Pages

Sign up for updates from UNL Water

Sign Up Here