Stormwater Management

Surface Water Stormwater Management

Stormwater Management

Stormwater is water from rain and melting snow and ice. Stormwater can soak into the soil (infiltrate), be held on the surface and evaporate, or run off and end up in a nearby stream, river, or other water body. Before land is developed with buildings, roadways, and agriculture, the majority of stormwater soaks into the soil or evaporates.

Stormwater Regulations

The National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), established through the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) Amendments of 1972 (later amended and known collectively as the Clean Water Act), regulates water quality by requiring a permit for point source pollution discharges to waters of the United States.

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Soil Erosion and Sediment Control

Soil erosion and sediment loss from construction sites has been documented as a major source of water pollution. Bare soil exposed to a rain event can become quickly eroded, leading to sediment that moves into adjacent storm sewers or lakes and streams. 

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Land Planning Standards

An important component in implementing effective best management practices for stormwater management is the regulatory context for land development. Land Planning Standards are changing, and there are many good examples that have been rewritten to provide a stronger framework for land development that integrates green stormwater management practices.

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Conservation Subdivision Design

Conservation subdivision design (CSD) entails a broad range of design principles and parameters that collectively enhance environmental quality, the aesthetics and quality-of-life of residents in the subdivision, and the profitability of the development for the developer.

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Green Roofs

Green roofs are becoming a critical component in "green" urban infrastructure, and can provide a wide variety of environmental, aesthetic and cost benefits. A green roof can cover any size building and be used on any building type given the building has been designed or retrofitted to structurally support the weight. It generally consists of drought-tolerant vegetation and light-weight growing medium layered over an efficient drainage system and waterproofing membrane.

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