Agricultural Production Animal Manure Management

Manure Nutrient Management

Proposed Changes to Nebraska Recommendations for Manure Nitrogen Credit

Managing manure for economic and environmental benefit is based, in part, upon our ability to efficiently recycle manure nitrogen (N) between animals and crops. This article introduces University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) proposed changes in recommendations for crediting manure nitrogen in a crop’s fertility program.

Read More

Soil sampling for better fertilization decisions

Soil sampling and testing are essential to determine soil properties and fertility levels to make good management decisions about fertilizer, manure, and lime application rates. Appropriate nutrient and amendment applications can increase crop yield, reduced input cost, and minimize environmental impact. Soil testing becomes inexpensive when compared to the total investment in crops and fertilizers.

Read More

Manure Nitrogen Use for Increased Profit and Environmental Protection

For many years, the University has used a recommended equivalence of 47% available over the course of 3 years for feedlot manure, 37% for compost, and 52% available for poultry manure with litter. Recent research shows that these numbers may be a little low, but they are intentionally conservative so as not to limit yield due to nitrogen deficiency.

Read More

Poultry Litter’s Agronomic and Natural Resource Benefits

Many Nebraska farmers are experienced with using beef feedlot and swine manures as fertility products. Over the next few years, Nebraska crop farmers may have opportunities to consider using broiler poultry litter as a soil amendment and fertilizer. Other regions of the US have a history of using poultry litter in crop production from which we can take away a few lessons.

Read More

The science behind 50-degree soil and nitrogen application

Does nitrogen becoming nitrate mean we are going to lose it? No, it takes rainfall or snowmelt in the spring that will cause a leaching event, but it does increase the risk of loss. Certainly, there is a balance between making sure we get our manure applied before the soil freezes and applying too early, but hopefully the information above illustrates a bit behind the science of the 50°F and cooling recommendation.

Read More

Pages

Sign up for updates from UNL Water

Sign Up Here