Agricultural Production Animal Manure Management

Manure Nutrient Management

The science behind 50-degree soil and nitrogen application

graphic of thermometer
Does nitrogen becoming nitrate mean we are going to lose it? No, it takes rainfall or snowmelt in the spring that will cause a leaching event, but it does increase the risk of loss. Certainly, there is a balance between making sure we get our manure applied before the soil freezes and applying too early, but hopefully the information above illustrates a bit behind the science of the 50°F and cooling recommendation.

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Biological benefits of manure application on agricultural soils

Biological Benefits of Manure Application
Soil quality has been traditionally described in terms of chemical and physical properties; however, soil organisms play an important role in soil health. Some studies suggest that using manure as soil amendment could result in increased microbial biomass, which results in higher soil bacteria, fungi and higher microbial activity. Soil microbial activity is crucial for nutrient cycling, aggregate stability, fertility, and other soil characteristics leading to better crop productivity.

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Manure Application Following Silage

photo of corn silage harvest
With silage harvest coming up quickly, manure application will soon follow. Because silage is often the first crop to come off the field, it allows for earlier manure application and thus an earlier cleanout of pens before winter. As that manure application plan develops, include best stewardship practices for optimum rates and preferred application methods for final decisions.

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Backyard Biogas Production from Animal Manure: Process and Utilization

Fixed-Dome Type biogas plant (Vigeli et al, 2014)
This article outlines the process of production and benefits of utilization of biogas from manure for small scale animal farmers, especially those in developing countries. Apart from the sanitary benefit of proper management of manure, this article highlights other benefits that can be derived from animal manure. Thus, encouraging these farmers to store manure from their animal farms for use, thereby changing waste to valuable resources.

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Dietary Strategies to Reduce Nitrogen and Phosphorus Excretion in Feedlot Cattle

Cows at Feeding Station
Dietary nutrients, specifically nitrogen and phosphorus, are excreted in manure from feedlot cattle. Dietary strategies, including calculated protein supplementation and phase-feeding programs, can be implemented by cattle feeders to decrease nutrient excretion and improve nutritional efficiency of the animal.

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