Storage & Treatment Options

Agricultural Production Animal Manure Management

Storage & Treatment Options

Manure storage structures are key to managing manure from animal feeding operations. The quality, composition, and consistency of manure greatly influence livestock manure facility design. Handling characteristics often dictate the type of facility. The University of Nebraska has developed resources for Vegetative Treatment Systems and Anaerobic Digesters.

Lagoon Closure and Your Environmental Responsibility

Abandoned manure storages present a risk to the environment by accidental overflow or leakage due to lack of management. It is in the best interest of the environment and the property owner, who is liable for any environmental damage resulting from any discharge, whether leakage or overflow, to properly close any unused manure storage structure.

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Managing Runoff Holding Ponds During Wet Weather

When designed properly, runoff holding ponds, lagoons, and other earthen manure storage structures are sized to contain manure, process wastewater, and storm water that drain into or fall on them throughout their designed storage period. Excess precipitation, particularly chronic wet weather, can lead to concerns about storages overflowing even when they have been managed correctly.

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Lagoon Closure Demonstration

The closure of aged livestock lagoons and earthen manure storage basins needs to be conducted in a manner that controls potential environmental risk and makes economical use of accumulated nutrients in the biosolids. This event will offer a unique opportunity to hear about and see the step-by-step process for planning and conducting a lagoon closure.

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Methane (Anaerobic) Digesters

A methane digester system, commonly referred to as an AD (anaerobic digester), is a device that promotes the decomposition of manure or 'digestion' of the organics in manure to simple organics and gaseous biogas products.

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VTS Guidance Document

Vegetative Treatment Systems for Open Lot Runoff was developed under the leadership of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) through an Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) agreement, with collaboration from representatives from several land grant universities, USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Iowa Cattlemen’s Association, and private sector representatives.

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