Drinking Water & Wells

Residential Water Use Drinking Water & Water Wells

Drinking Water & Wells

How much do you really know about the water you drink every day? Where does it come from? Is it safe to drink? Is a home water treatment system necessary? How can drinking water be protected? Explore this section for more detailed information that will help you answer questions or solve problems you may have.

Proactive Drinking Water Management for a Unique Water System

Little Nemaha River

The City of Auburn, population 3,000, is located in southeast Nebraska, near the Little Nemaha River, approximately seven miles upstream of its confluence with the Missouri River. The City receives its drinking water from a wellfield located east of the community within an alluvial aquifer along the Little Nemaha River. The wellfield consists of 11 vertical wells averaging 45 to 50 feet below the ground's surface, pumping up to 150 million gallons per year.

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Iron and manganese in water

dirty pipe

Discolored water. A strange odor. Stained ceramic fixtures such as tubs, sinks and toilets. Discolored clothes, towels and dishes. Reduced water pressure.  These are all some of the potential impacts from high levels of iron and manganese in your water supply. 

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Celebrate (and check) your drinking water in May

water testing kit

National Drinking Water Week is held in May each year to bring attention to important water quantity and quality issues and their relationship to drinking water supplies.  The attention to drinking water during that week provides an opportunity to learn more water resources in general and also serves a reminder to think about where your water comes from.

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Salt-Free Water "Softener" Alternatives

In recent years several emerging non-chemical technologies based on a variety of physical phenomena have entered the market to aid consumers in addressing the problems caused by hard water.  These are an alternative to a traditional ion exchange water softener.  Generally these technologies do not remove most of the hardness minerals from the water, but reduce the problems associated by the hardness.  

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National Groundwater Awareness Week

National Groundwater Awareness Week logo

National Groundwater Awareness Week

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