Groundwater

Groundwater

Groundwater

Groundwater is vital to the “Good Life” in Nebraska. It maintains our agricultural economy, supplies water to streams and lakes, and provides drinking water to municipalities and rural households. Nebraskans pump groundwater out of the High Plains aquifer and many other aquifers across the state. The vast majority of groundwater is used for agricultural production.

Nebraska GeoCloud: An Information Hub for Nebraska Groundwater

Using high-tech instruments suspended from helicopters, Nebraska’s Natural Resources Districts are getting a new look at what lies below. Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys use principles of electromagnetic induction to generate images of the subsurface. In the past ten years, more than 18,000 miles of AEM surveys were completed in the State: about 6,600 miles were flown in 2018 alone.

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Celebrate (and check) your drinking water in May

National Drinking Water Week is held in May each year to bring attention to important water quantity and quality issues and their relationship to drinking water supplies.  The attention to drinking water during that week provides an opportunity to learn more water resources in general and also serves a reminder to think about where your water comes from.

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National Groundwater Awareness Week

National Groundwater Awareness Week

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Papio-Missouri River NRD Groundwater Management Plan--Public Meetings

Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District (P-MRNRD) has recently revised its Groundwater Management Plan.  The plan was revised to incorporate, and respond to, new data and information about groundwater quantity and quality throughout the District.  The new plan incorporates data from recent studies as well as regulation changes including:

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An Overview of Secondary Aquifers in Nebraska

Nebraska is a groundwater-rich state. Nebraska has one primary aquifer, the High Plains Aquifer, and seven secondary aquifers. These secondary aquifers supply water to more than 4000 active wells spread across 30 counties.

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