Groundwater

Groundwater

Groundwater is vital to the “Good Life” in Nebraska. It maintains our agricultural economy, supplies water to streams and lakes, and provides drinking water to municipalities and rural households. Nebraskans pump groundwater out of the High Plains aquifer and many other aquifers across the state. The vast majority of groundwater is used for agricultural production.

Naturally Occurring Elements in Groundwater Part 2 of a Series — Iron and Manganese

There are naturally occurring elements and minerals within Nebraska’s geology, and with that, it is not uncommon to find them in Nebraska’s groundwater. Calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, fluoride, arsenic, and uranium are among the elements found in Nebraska. This month, the spotlight series continues with iron and manganese.

Iron & Manganese

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Naturally Occurring Elements in Nebraska’s Groundwater: Part 1 of a Series - Calcium and Magnesium

infographic of water ion exchange

Caption:  A simple overview of how the water softening process works. As hard water enters the water softener, it filters through a resin that is supersaturated with a sodium (Na) brine. The calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in the hard water attach to the resin beads and are exchanged for sodium (Na), thus making soft water for use throughout the home. Over time, the exchange resin becomes saturated with Ca and Mg and has to be regenerated with the Na brine solution so an effective water softening process can continue. (Graphic by Nebraska Extension)

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Small communities pay high costs for clean water

main street and water tower
In Nebraska, 85% of our citizens rely on drinking water pumped from the ground. When a community's public drinking water supply is affected by high nitrate levels that exceed 10 ppm, it can cost hundreds of thousands - even millions - of dollars to fix.

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Nebraska Groundwater Levels Rise Following Wet Year

Groundwater level changes for Nebrasks for 2018 versus 2019
Groundwater levels across much of Nebraska continue to rebound from the historic 2012 drought, according to the 2019 Groundwater-Level Monitoring Report. On average, wells measured in spring 2019 saw a 2.63-foot increase in groundwater levels statewide.

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No-till, Cover Crops, And Planned Grazing Systems Workshop to be held in Norfolk February 12th

If you are interested in learning more about Soil Health, Cover Crops and Nitrogen Management consider attending the No-till cover crops grazing workshop held by the Bazile Groundwater Management Area, Lower Elkhorn Natural Resource District and the NRCS in Norfolk at the Lifelong Learning Center. The workshop will run from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with lunch provided by the Bazile Groundwater Area NRDs.

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