Agricultural Production Crop Production

Crop Production

The production of crops is the heart of Nebraska's economy. Water is essential to all plant growth. Thus Nebraska's economy relies on a plentiful supply of water to produce crops – in both rainfed and irrigated environments. Several factors involved with producing crops interact with either water supply or water quality issues – or both.

Planning 2021 Fertilizer-N Application Following a Dry 2020

Fertilizer-N is a big investment for crop production in Nebraska and elsewhere. After harvest, growers tend to plan their fertilizer-N management for the next year’s crop. But the question is how much nitrogen can they apply to get the most profit from their fertilizer-N investment?

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The connection between soil organic matter and soil water

One benefit of increasing soil organic matter is to store more water in your soil. Why does this happen? Because soil organic matter creates pores in a range of sizes. Exactly how much more water is stored due to soil organic matter will depend on soil texture, though. Animal manures are one option for increasing soil organic matter and soil health.

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Proposed Changes to Nebraska Recommendations for Manure Nitrogen Credit

Managing manure for economic and environmental benefit is based, in part, upon our ability to efficiently recycle manure nitrogen (N) between animals and crops. This article introduces University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) proposed changes in recommendations for crediting manure nitrogen in a crop’s fertility program.

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Soil sampling for better fertilization decisions

Soil sampling and testing are essential to determine soil properties and fertility levels to make good management decisions about fertilizer, manure, and lime application rates. Appropriate nutrient and amendment applications can increase crop yield, reduced input cost, and minimize environmental impact. Soil testing becomes inexpensive when compared to the total investment in crops and fertilizers.

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Manure Nitrogen Use for Increased Profit and Environmental Protection

For many years, the University has used a recommended equivalence of 47% available over the course of 3 years for feedlot manure, 37% for compost, and 52% available for poultry manure with litter. Recent research shows that these numbers may be a little low, but they are intentionally conservative so as not to limit yield due to nitrogen deficiency.

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