Wastewater

Surface Water Wastewater

Wastewater

Extension at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is actively involved in programming that helps homeowners, industry, and youth audiences understand onsite wastewater treatment systems for handling domestic sewage. Treatment of wastewater using onsite systems, such as septic tanks and drainfields, plays a very important role in protecting the water and environment of Nebraska and supporting economic development. As a result of Extension programming, Nebraskans benefit from improved water quality and a cleaner environment.

Soil & Site Evaluation

The ability of soil to accept water or for water to travel through soil is called soil permeability. Percolation is the movement of water through soil. A soil percolation test is designed to measure the rate of water movement in saturated soil (mimicking conditions that soil treatment systems have) so that one can decide the appropriate type and size of treatment system.

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How does a septic system work?

A system typically has 3 parts: plumbing from the house, a septic tank, and an effluent treatment system.

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NebGuides

The University of Nebraska Extension is committed to meeting Nebraskans' information and education needs in a timely and efficient manner. We make the information you need or want available on demand, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week through a series of onsite wastewater treatment publications. Publications will provide you with know how on all the topics below. All are available at local Extension offices throughout the state, or are ready for download right here on our site.

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Domestic Sewage FAQs

I have a septic system. What maintenance does it need?
One of the most important things you can do to keep the system functioning properly is to have the septic tank pumped regularly by a certified professional. Scum and/or sludge could build up and be carried to the drainfield if the tank is not pumped regularly. This will clog the drainfield and not allow wastewater to be treated. Wastewater may form a pond in the yard or back up into the house. At that point you are probably facing costly repairs or replacement instead of minimal maintenance expenses.

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