Lakes, Ponds & Streams

Surface Water Lakes, Ponds & Streams

Lakes, Ponds & Streams

Water quality protection practices properly implemented on the landscape can reduce or eliminate overland runoff water. Pollutants associated with that runoff water will enter lakes, ponds and streams.

To Aerate or Not to Aerate? That is the winter question.

It’s been getting colder and winter is upon us.  If you have an aerator in your pond you maybe wondering what to do with it.  Cold water holds more oxygen, animal and plant use of this oxygen is lower than in the winter than the summer, and oxygen-using decomposition is very slow.  So, if the pond is open most of the winter or only has occasional ice cover, the pond should not have an oxygen problem.  In this case, aeration is not benefitting the pond.

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Nebraska Beach Monitoring

Are you planning a day at the lake?  Did you know you can check on the water quality before you head out?

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Zebra Mussels in Nebraska

Boating season is once again upon us and it is time to remember to clean, drain and dry watercrafts, angling equipment and any other items that come in contact with a waterbody between uses.  Zebra mussels, an invasive small mussel species, can live out of water for up to 2 weeks in the summer time in the right conditions and cleaning, draining and drying watercrafts and equipment for at least 5 days before launching in a different waterbody is pertinent.  Currently there is no effective way to eliminate 100% of zebra mussels from a waterbody so prevention is key. 

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Lake Management Workshops

Spring will be here before we know it and that means enjoying the outdoors! Its time for kayaking, swimming and fishing. And, if you are a pond or lake owner, it's time to think about what kind of management strategies you will use for your pond or lake this year.

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Sandpit Lake Basics – Where does the water come from?

Lakes are classified in a number of ways to help us understand how they function, make predictions, assess ecosystem health, and establish management strategies or regulations.  They are most commonly classified by the lake’s ability to support plant and animal life, or productivity. They can also be classified based on the water supply, how humans use them, plant and animal communities, or how they were formed (e.g.  glacier retreating, volcanic eruption, made by man).

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