Lakes, Ponds & Streams

Surface Water Lakes, Ponds & Streams

Lakes, Ponds & Streams

Water quality protection practices properly implemented on the landscape can reduce or eliminate overland runoff water. Pollutants associated with that runoff water will enter lakes, ponds and streams.

Fall Turnover: A Physical Look at Lakes

In most of Nebraska, deep lakes will tend to stratify or form layers, especially during summer. This happens because the density of water changes as its temperature changes. During the summer, a temperature difference is established between the upper water and lower water in a lake. The upper layer of water, called the epilimnion, is warm.  This layer is about as deep as the sun can penetrate.  The deep layer of water, called the hypoliminion is made of cooler water.

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Nebraska Nitrate Working Groups - Summary and Call for Action

An aerial view of pivot circles
Collaborating organizations
Aubudon Nebraska
Aubudon Nebraska
Central Platte Natural Resources District

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Mullen and Cameron Peak Wildfires and Their Potential Effect on Nebraska Ag

Burn area from the Mullen fire along Wyoming Hwy 230. Photo by Gary Stone.
The Upper North Platte River watershed headwaters is located in north-central Colorado, close to Walden, CO. The Sierra Madre mountain range is on the west side of the headwaters and the Snowy Range mountain range is on the east side. Snowmelt from both of these mountain ranges together contribute approximately 75 percent of the water flow in the North Platte River. The fires’ effect on water supplies in the coming years will depend on the amount of snow fall and snowpack received in the watershed during the winter and early spring. There may be slightly higher incidences of sediment runoff in isolated areas where there is little or no ground cover due to the fire.

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Nitrate in Nebraska

From increased water bills to closed lakes to tainted drinking water, high nitrate levels are affecting thousands of Nebraskans.

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Understanding Bacteria in Lakes

Bacteria Analysis

A dip in the lake can be refreshing, but it’s important to consider what’s going on in the water that you may not see – especially for E. coli bacteria.

Identifying an E.coli issue

It’s fairly easy to see Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and algae at a lake.  Unfortunately, the same visual assessment does not apply to E. coli.  However, there are three indicators of E. coli in a lake to consider:

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