Lawn and Landscape Irrigation

Residential Water Use Lawns, Gardens & Landscapes

Lawn and Landscape Irrigation

Lawns and landscapes can be designed and maintained to be water conserving, prevent runoff of fertilizers and pesticides and good looking. To develop a landscape that is water efficient, build the landscape with good landscape soils, create water zones within your landscape, choose well-adapted water saving ornamentals and turfgrasses, and utilize the correct irrigation equipment for your landscape. Read on for more information to help you design and manage your landscape for water efficiency.

Slow it Down, Soak it in: Conserving Rainwater with Downspout Disconnection

downspout redirection into a flower garden

When it rains in July and August, we are almost always thankful for the moisture. And yet this valuable resource is often directed off of properties and out of town as quickly as possible via downspouts and storm drains.

Stormwater runoff is rainwater that does not soak into the ground. It flows from rooftops, streets, parking lots, sidewalks, driveways, bare soil, sloped lawns, and other areas.

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Watering New Trees and Shrubs

Planting a shrub, Photo by John Fech

Many new trees and shrubs are planted in April, May and June.  By far, the two most important considerations are implementing the proper techniques for planting and watering.

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Periods of Critical Water Needs in the Vegetable Garden

Onions in the garden

In the vegetable garden, an even supply of water throughout the growing season is directly related to quality and yield of vegetables harvested from the garden. Generally, vegetable demand for water is high during the first few weeks of growth following germination, right after transplanting, and during flowering and fruit development. However, with each vegetable crop there are particular developmental stages when having a good supply of water is critical.

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Watering During Turf Establishment

Irrigating lawn with a sprinkler
If damage from voles, skunks, ice, cold temperatures or other factors have left your lawn a bit on the thin side, mid-spring is a good time to thicken up the stand. Likewise, if your landscape has a bare area due to construction or a major change, turf establishment is probably on the agenda. After the soil temperature has warmed to 50-55 degrees F for several days, been prepared with a power rake or core cultivator, the seeds dropped onto the bare soil or opened up turf stand and raked lightly with an upturned leaf rake, the next step is water to start the germination process.

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Proven Rain Garden Plants for Nebraska

Joe-Pye Weed

Rain gardens have been a landscape feature for a while now. This has helped us determine which plants are proving to do well in the bottom of rain gardens.

Rain gardens are shallow depressions located where they collect rainwater from a slope or downspout. Their purpose is to make the most of rainfall when received by soaking it in and reducing the amount of runoff during rain storms.

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