Stormwater Management

Surface Water Stormwater Management

Stormwater Management

Stormwater is water from rain and melting snow and ice. Stormwater can soak into the soil (infiltrate), be held on the surface and evaporate, or run off and end up in a nearby stream, river, or other water body. Before land is developed with buildings, roadways, and agriculture, the majority of stormwater soaks into the soil or evaporates.

Stormwater Education for Kids

The stormwater activity sheets below can be downloaded and used with the Stormwater Sleuth comic book or on their own. They are designed for students from 4th - 6th grades, but may be appropriate for other ages as well.

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Publications

Download educational materials about stormwater management developed by Nebraska Extension Educators and Specialists.

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Stormwater Regulations

The National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), established through the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) Amendments of 1972 (later amended and known collectively as the Clean Water Act), regulates water quality by requiring a permit for point source pollution discharges to waters of the United States.

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Soil Erosion and Sediment Control

Soil erosion and sediment loss from construction sites has been documented as a major source of water pollution. Bare soil exposed to a rain event can become quickly eroded, leading to sediment that moves into adjacent storm sewers or lakes and streams. 

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Land Planning Standards

An important component in implementing effective best management practices for stormwater management is the regulatory context for land development. Land Planning Standards are changing, and there are many good examples that have been rewritten to provide a stronger framework for land development that integrates green stormwater management practices.

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