Watering During Turf Establishment

Irrigating lawn with a sprinkler
If damage from voles, skunks, ice, cold temperatures or other factors have left your lawn a bit on the thin side, mid-spring is a good time to thicken up the stand. Likewise, if your landscape has a bare area due to construction or a major change, turf establishment is probably on the agenda. After the soil temperature has warmed to 50-55 degrees F for several days, been prepared with a power rake or core cultivator, the seeds dropped onto the bare soil or opened up turf stand and raked lightly with an upturned leaf rake, the next step is water to start the germination process.

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Water Law 101: Part 4, Groundwater Terms and Definitions

Center pivot irrigation in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska
Part 4 of a six-part series about basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource. Water law can be traced back to Roman times and also has roots in English common law. Across the United States, it varies from state to state, and from East to West. When conflicts arise, courts usually determine the outcome, unless there are state or federal laws or previous case studies to resolve the issue. Exceptions to the law can arise from differences in each state’s water laws.

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Antibiotic use on food animals and its effect on antimicrobial resistance spread and human health.

All food animal managers and pet owners have a role to plan in protecting medically important antimicrobial. Follow @i_AMResponsible on Twitter. Developed by: iAMResponsible.
Most people alive today have never known a world without antibiotics. Antibiotics became widely used to treat bacterial infections in the 1930s and ‘40s, and were quickly labeled a “miracle drug”. But, as widespread use of antibiotics evolved, so did the discovery of antibiotic resistant bacteria. And we have now entered an era where antibiotic resistance is considered one of the biggest worldwide public health challenges of our time.

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Water Law 101: Part 3, Surface Water Administration Terms and Definitions

Niobrara River near Valentine, Nebraska
This is the third in a six-part series of articles covering basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource. Water law can be traced back to Roman times and also has roots in English common law. Across the United States, it varies from state to state, and from East to West. When conflicts arise, courts usually determine the outcome, unless there are state or federal laws or previous case studies to resolve the issue. Exceptions to the law can arise from differences in each state’s water laws.

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What poultry and livestock have to offer to your cropland

The value of manure from poultry and livestock production
Nebraska’s livestock industry can benefit from manure generated in the integrated animal and corn agricultural system. Farmers, who only run crop operations, can also benefit from animal manure field applications.

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Water Law 101: Part 2, Other Water Rights

Water from Pathfinder Reservoir on the North Platte River near Casper, Wyoming, is sent over the overflow spillway. Water is spilled occasionally when snowmelt runoff from the mountains above Pathfinder becomes too great to store in the reservoir. (Photo credit: Gary Stone)
This is the second in a six-part series of articles covering basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource. Water law has a long history. It can be traced back to Roman times and also has roots in English common law. Across the United States, it varies from state to state, and from East to West. When conflicts arise the courts usually determine the outcome, unless there are state or federal laws or previous case studies to resolve the issue. Exceptions to the law can arise from differences in each state’s water laws.

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Naturally Occurring Elements in Groundwater Part 2 of a Series — Iron and Manganese

There are naturally occurring elements and minerals within Nebraska’s geology, and with that, it is not uncommon to find them in Nebraska’s groundwater. Calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, fluoride, arsenic, and uranium are among the elements found in Nebraska. This month, the spotlight series continues with iron and manganese.

Iron & Manganese

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Water Law 101: Part 1, the Basics

A thunderstorm replenishes the Nebraska Panhandle with water.
This the first in a six-part series of articles covering basic water law in the United States, predominately in the western part of the country, and how it affects this finite resource.

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Turf Fertilization for Healthy Lawns and Water Resources

Fertilizer on sidewalk

The lawn fertilization season is just around the corner. For a healthy turf and to help protect water resources, following the traditional four step program may not be the best route to go.

A well-managed turf holds soil in place and acts as a filter for potential water pollutants. However, fertilizing more than is needed, at the wrong time of the season, or misapplying fertilizer can result in nutrient runoff with the potential to degrade water resources.

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Manure Phosphorus and Water Quality

Chesapeake Bay experiences summer algae bloom connected with excess phosphorus.
Manure produced in animal feeding operations is a source of fertilizer that can be used to reduce our dependency on commercial fertilizers. Manure contains several essential nutrients that crops that crops rely on to grow, most notably nitrogen and phosphorus. Proper management of manure before, during, and after land application helps to slow down the contamination of our streams and reservoirs.

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