Salty Snow and Slush Damage

As snow and ice are cleared from the driveway and sidewalk, there may be more than frozen water in the shovel.

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Manure: Waste or Valuable Agricultural Resource?

Is manure a “Waste” that pollutes our water resources and creates undesirable nuisances for communities? Or, is manure a “Resource” that reduces the demand inorganic fertilizers and improves the health of our soils? A team of university educators and agricultural organizations would like to learn more about the issues most important to you as you make decisions for the use of manure in cropping systems.

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Is This Plant Dead?

You hear these terms – “the dead of winter” and “dead to the world”, but what do they really mean?  In most cases, they’re exaggerations or synonyms for other situations; in this case, really cold weather with no end in sight and really, really tired.

In the plant world, the question of “is this plant dead?” comes up quite frequently, especially in winter, and especially with broadleaf evergreens such as arborvitae, yews, holly, boxwood and Oregon hollygrape.

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Poultry Litter’s Agronomic and Natural Resource Benefits

Many Nebraska farmers are experienced with using beef feedlot and swine manures as fertility products. Over the next few years, Nebraska crop farmers may have opportunities to consider using broiler poultry litter as a soil amendment and fertilizer. Other regions of the US have a history of using poultry litter in crop production from which we can take away a few lessons.

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Nebraska Extension Offering Land Application Training in January and February

Livestock producers with livestock waste control facility permits received or renewed since April 1998 must be certified, and farms must complete an approved training every five years. Participants who attend the day-long (9 am – 3:30 pm) event will receive NDEE Initial Land Application Training Certification. In many locations Recertification will be held during the last two and a half hours of the day-long land application training. Other locations are holding the Recertification training as a separate event. Farm personnel responsible for land application of manure are encouraged to attend for either training. Discounts for multiple employee attendance are available.

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2020 Nutrient Management Record Keeping Calendars Now Available!

The 2020 Nutrient Management Record Keeping Calendars are now available from Nebraska Extension. Tracking manure application rates, part of the calendar’s record keeping tools, is important for getting the maximum crop nutrient value from manure and documenting one’s environmental stewardship.

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Effects of Manure on Fish Populations

Algal blooms may occur in bodies of water with excess amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus. These algal blooms are detrimental to fish populations, other animal populations, and possibly human health.

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Managing Leaves in Your Lawn

Fall is a great time of the year. Trees develop beautiful fall colors, and then those leaves fall to the ground. Tree leaves are fun to play in as a kid and most everyone loves the crunch sound under your feet as we walk over fallen leaves. However, leaves should not be left on the lawn. This can be damaging to turfgrass and to surface water. It is best to use leaves or remove them.

Why Rake

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The Five Things Every Livestock Farmer Should Know About Biosecurity

If you raise livestock or poultry, you know it is in your best interest to keep your animals as healthy as possible. Healthy animals grow better. They also produce higher quality products, like meat, milk and eggs, and produce them with greater efficiency when they are healthy. So, along with keeping animals well fed and watered, comfortable, and safe, it is important to keep them healthy by minimizing their exposure to disease-causing organisms.

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Groundwater Protection: It's up to Everyone

Groundwater Protection: It’s Up to Everyone

 If you think about the water cycle, you begin to realize the water we use every day, is in essence, recycled. There’s no new water, we are drinking some of the same water the dinosaurs drank!

Keeping our drinking water sources safe begins with each of us. There are many things everyone can do to assist with groundwater protection whether you live in an urban or rural area.

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