Odor Footprint Tool

Odor Footprint Graphic
The Odor Footprint Tool (OFT) estimates the frequency of annoying odor events around an existing or proposed livestock facility and uses this information to determine minimum separation distances that should be maintained around those facilities and to help in siting decisions.

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OFT Worksheet Version

Step-by-step instructions for using the worksheet version of the Odor Footprint Tool and an example completed worksheet are provided in the following documents.

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Manure Management for Biosecurity

The potential for disease transfer due to manure handling equipment moving among manure storages or farms should not be overlooked. If a producer operates their own pumping equipment, they will know if PEDV or other diseases are a risk on their farm and should be able to take extra precautions to avoid spreading the disease to other facilities or farms that they own.

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Mortality Management

Mortality Management Video Thumbnail
In Nebraska, routine livestock mortalities can be legally disposed of in five different ways: burial, incineration, composting, rendering, and disposal in a landfill. Regardless of which method is used, it is important to dispose of the animal or animals within 24 hours of death, or sooner if possible. When choosing a mortality disposal method, cost, labor input, and personal preferences usually dictate an individual’s decision.

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Controlling Emissions

Pink dust cloud
Good stewardship calls upon livestock and poultry producers to limit emissions of air pollutants where feasible. Odor control practices and technologies may take several forms. Information on control strategies may focus upon the type of emissions controlled or the source of air emissions.

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Mortality Composting

Thumbnail of mortality management demonstration video
Mortalities are an unfortunate reality for livestock operations. Whether they’re caused by disease or natural disaster, losses of livestock do occur and these mortalities must be managed responsibly. The state of Nebraska allows for disposal of dead animals via several methods including burial, rendering, incineration, composting, and landfilling.

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Land Application Training Requirements

The NPDES permittee, authorized representative, or an employee of the operation shall complete a land application training program approved by the Department within 180 days of NPDES permit coverage unless such training was satisfactorily completed in the previous 5 years. Additional training is required every 5 years.

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LB 677 and Its Impact on Nebraska Animal Feeding Operations

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules that took effect April 14, 2003 defined the procedures for defining animal feeding operations (AFOs) as well as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). CAFOs are required to obtain a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit from Nebraska Department of Environment Quality.

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Understanding US EPA Regulations

Several federal regulations may impact animal producers and their operations including the Clean Water Act and provisions that relate to NPDES permits. The federal EPA statutes that have relevance to animal agriculture are summarized at EPA's Agricultural Law Web site.

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NDEQ Resources on Regulations

The NDEQ Web site provides numerous publications to assist producers with Title 130 compliance including annual report forms, applications and forms, fact sheets, guidance documents, and standard operating procedures.

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