Amy Millmier Schmidt - Livestock Bioenvironmental Engineer

Amy Millmier Schmidt - Livestock Bioenvironmental Engineer

The Five Things Every Livestock Farmer Should Know About Biosecurity

If you raise livestock or poultry, you know it is in your best interest to keep your animals as healthy as possible. Healthy animals grow better. They also produce higher quality products, like meat, milk and eggs, and produce them with greater efficiency when they are healthy. So, along with keeping animals well fed and watered, comfortable, and safe, it is important to keep them healthy by minimizing their exposure to disease-causing organisms.

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Disposal of Flood Soaked Grains and Forages

Flood-soaked grain or hay is almost certain to be contaminated, making it unfit for use as food or feed.  This summary describes regulatory considerations and recommended actions for management of agricultural grains and forages deemed unusable for food or feed following flooding.

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Emergency Disposal of Livestock Carcasses

Five methods are approved for the routine disposal of livestock carcasses in Nebraska: composting, burial, incineration, rendering and land-filling. In an emergency situation – such as when livestock losses occur due to extreme weather or another non-disease related event – these five options still exist, but may not be suitable in all situations. The feasibility of carcass disposal via incineration, rendering or land-filling will depend on existing infrastructure or resources and, therefore, will not be discussed here. Acceptable processes for emergency composting and burial of livestock carcasses are described here.

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Emergency Holding Pond Management During Wet Weather

Many areas of Nebraska have experienced higher than normal precipitation events recently, with some areas receiving rainfall that far exceeded a 25-year, 24-hour storm event. This abnormally wet weather pattern has caused drainage and flooding issues in some parts of the state. The Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality and Nebraska Extension would like to remind producers and landowners to be vigilant in monitoring lagoon and runoff holding pond levels.

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When is Movement of Manure Considered a “Manure Transfer”?

If you are an owner or employee on a permitted animal feeding operation, you know very well that maintaining complete and accurate manure management records is necessary to comply with your nutrient management plan (NMP). While you may have enough land within your operation to utilize all manure nutrients produced, it is quite common for manure to be transported from a livestock operation where it was produced to a neighboring crop farm for land application.

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