Leslie Johnson - Animal Manure Management Extension Educator

Leslie Johnson - Animal Manure Management Extension Educator

Carbon Sources for Composting HPAI Mortalities

Nebraska Extension is calling on municipalities, lawn care companies, farmers and others to donate or sell wood chips, hay, lawn waste and other carbon sources to livestock producers hit hard by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI).

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Manure Use and Composting following Application of Certain Herbicides

Example graphic from a pesticide label with grazing and composting restrictions.
The prices of synthetic fertilizers have increased significantly over the last year leaving growers and even homeowners facing the decision of finding alternative sources of nutrients. One great option is the use of manure or compost from a local farm or from your own operation. The use of manure in gardening can loosen compacted soil, increase carbon in the soil, and reduce surface runoff and leaching all while providing nutrients that your plants need. While this option is great, it is important to be aware of the potential carry over of herbicides in manure from grazing animals.

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New UNL Manure Nitrogen Crediting Recommendations for Crop Fertility

pile of manure with N sources
University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) has changed recommendations for crediting nitrogen following manure applications for field crops. New research has shown that most manures are similar changing the organic-nitrogen availability factors.

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Valuing Manure as a Seller or a Buyer

spreading manure

When talking about manure's value, one needs to think about a variety of factors. Most folks think of fertilizer nutrients as manure’s primary value or MVP, but it takes more than one or two star players to make a great team. As such, manure wouldn't be as great as it is without other characteristics like the added organic matter that you get when applying manure, or the microbial community that is added to your field with that application.

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“Applying Manure Management Concepts On-Farm” Programs in February and March

program graphic
The Animal Manure Management team is hosting “Applying Manure Management Concepts On-Farm” programs across the state. They begin on February 8th in Lexington and continue throughout February and into March. While these events have traditionally been targeted at livestock operations that are required to attend as part of their permit, the team has made huge progress the last several years in making the information in those programs very interactive and applied for anyone that uses manure. I encourage all crop farmers that use or are considering using manure to plan on attending. At the programs, you’ll discover how to determine which fields are the most economical for manure use and which fields can benefit the most from manure’s ability to improve soil health and water quality.

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